The Ten Commandments of Mindfulness

 
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1. Yearn not for a body free of disease and suffering, because without going through pain and illness, sundry desires are easily awakened.
        2. Wish not for a life free of mishaps and obstacles, because without them one tends to become arrogant and egotistical.

        3. Pray not for a quick shortcut regarding spiritual introspection, because without excruciating effort, one becomes small-minded. 

        4. Fear not the haunting disturbance of evil while accumulating spiritual strength, because without it one’s determination does not grow strong. 

        5. Hope not for easy success in one’s work, because without difficulties and failures, one tends to undervalue others and become overly proud. 

        6. Build not relationships on selfish gain, because a relationship based on profit has lost its genuine meaning.

        7. Look not for a universal consensus regarding one’s personal opinion, because complete adoption to a single opinion will render narrow mindedness.

        8. Expect not repayment or reward from others for one’s services, because calculation and expectations contradict true service.
        9. Engage not irrationally in profitable attractions, because jumping too quickly into temptation may well blind wisdom. 

        10. Stir not at being a victim of injustice, because eagerness to clarify reputation belongs to an ego too attached to let go. 



        These are the Buddha’s teachings:

        - Consider disease and suffering as medicines to the body

        - Regard mishaps as a means of self-liberation

        - Treat obstacles as enjoyable challenges

        - Greet haunting spirits as good companions

        - Consider difficulties as one of life’s enjoyments

        - Thank bad friends as helping you in self-adjustment

        - View dissents as friendly entertainment

        - See favors as merely unimportant sandals plentiful to discard.

        - Take disinterest from temptation as an honourable achievement.

        - Use injustice as an expedient door into spiritual perfection.
 



        To accept obstacles will bring wisdom, but to pray for wisdom will inevitably bring obstacles. It was within all such obstacles that The Thus Comes One became enlightened to the Ultimate Bodhi. He gladly instilled perfection to the Path of Enlightenment to all the people who wished to do harm to him, even with the great wickedness of Devadatta.

        Thus, do the difficulties faced in life not bring beneficial results? Can’t people’s destruction and damage to you bring support to your achievements? Today, because Buddhist practitioners dread to throw themselves into obstacles, when real obstacles finally come their way, they are too helpless to fend for themselves. The Absolute Dharma of nobility and superiority is therefore diminishing because of this pity. How regretful!